2014-07-03 / Sports

Roberts, Jones defend Glen Arbor men’s title

By Mike Spencer
Of The Enterprise staff


NICK SCHANHALS, left, listens to advice from his grandfather Rick Schanhals during a break Sunday in the men’s doubles semifinals of the Glen Arbor Tennis Tournament. NICK SCHANHALS, left, listens to advice from his grandfather Rick Schanhals during a break Sunday in the men’s doubles semifinals of the Glen Arbor Tennis Tournament. Doug Roberts and Karl Jones captured their second straight Glen Arbor Tennis Tournament men’s doubles title Sunday.

Roberts, a 1978 Glen Lake grad, and Jones defeated Traverse City’s Mike Rubino and Brian Eckert, 7-6, 4-6, 6-1 in the finals.

“The biggest difference was that we won the big points in the third set,” said Roberts, who lives in Lansing and has a home on Big Glen Lake.

The defending champs also caught a break in the first set, breaking serve down 5-4.

“They let us off the hook in the first set,” Robert said.

“Can’t win them all,” Rubino said. “We had momentum after winning the second set and breaking serve in the first game of the third set.”


CHARLIE CROUCH of Lansing and Glen Arbor returns a volley in Sunday’s men’s doubles consolation finals match. Crouch and Joe Katona, of Rochester and Lake Leelanau, lost 6-7, 6-2 and 10-3 in the tie-break. CHARLIE CROUCH of Lansing and Glen Arbor returns a volley in Sunday’s men’s doubles consolation finals match. Crouch and Joe Katona, of Rochester and Lake Leelanau, lost 6-7, 6-2 and 10-3 in the tie-break. But the defending champs broke serve on Rubino and Eckert to even things out.

“They broke right back and kept up the intensity until the finish,” Rubino said. “And then they converted on the break points while we did not.’

Roberts said he doesn’t play as much tennis as he used to, but the Glen Arbor event is a must.

“I play the tournament because it is a lot of fun,” Roberts said. “And because of the nice accommodating people that run it and decent players.

“I don’t play tournaments like I used to, but this one I make sure to pencil in.”

Rubino, who competed in the tournament last year, also reached the finals in the mixed doubles which were decided Saturday. They lost to Jordi Llore and Paige Cooley of Traverse City, 6-2, 6-2.


DOUG ROBERTS of Lansing and Big Glen Lake hits a backhand return Sunday in a men’s doubles semifinal match. Roberts and Karl Jones went on to win the Glen Arbor Tennis Tournament for the second straight year. DOUG ROBERTS of Lansing and Big Glen Lake hits a backhand return Sunday in a men’s doubles semifinal match. Roberts and Karl Jones went on to win the Glen Arbor Tennis Tournament for the second straight year. “I’ll happily spend a weekend in Glen Arbor any chance I get,” Rubino said. “The tournament runs smoothly due to director organization and positive attitudes displayed by all participants.

“One of the greatest aspects of the tournament is it brings in players from all over the state and Midwest.”

Rubino said the variety of competition is nice to see.

“It keeps the tennis interesting and new strategy can be implemented,” Rubino said. “I was impressed with the high level of play all weekend.


NICK SCHANHALS is all focus on his forehand return Sunday in a men’s doubles semifinal match. Nick was playing with his grandfather, Rick, of Glen Arbor. NICK SCHANHALS is all focus on his forehand return Sunday in a men’s doubles semifinal match. Nick was playing with his grandfather, Rick, of Glen Arbor. “It’s a long ways out, but I plan to attend as many years as possible.”

Jones and Roberts defeated Guillaume Hazael-Massieux and Llore, 6-4, 6-3, in a rain-delayed semifinal match.

Rubino and Eckert advanced with a 7-5, 6-1 semifinal win over Rick and Nick Schanhals. Rick Schanhals, a past winner from Glen Arbor with his son Mike, played the early rounds with Mike. Unfortunately, he had to go to a funeral and could not play on Sunday. Schanhals’ grandson Nick filled in.

“What fun to be able to play with both a son and a grandson in the tournament,” the elder Schanhals said, enjoying his first doubles action with his grandson. “He was amazing.

“I had not seen him play since last fall. He also plays basketball and is a lacrosse goalie. The lacrosse hand-eye skills transfer real well to playing tennis at the net. I thought Nick and I adjusted to each other’s game pretty quickly.”


MIKE RUBINO of Traverse City serves the ball in the men’s doubles semifi- nal match on Sunday. MIKE RUBINO of Traverse City serves the ball in the men’s doubles semifi- nal match on Sunday. Rick Schanhals, who picked up a tennis racket in 1969 while a freshman in high school, has enjoyed the family sport he has chosen.

“Now I have four children and five grandchildren who all play tennis,” he said. “Over the Fourth of July weekend, we have our annual family tennis tournament. The grandchildren really get into it and it is a great time that everyone looks forward to each year.”

Russ Daniel and Rick Budinger defeated Charlie Crouch and Joe Katona, 6-7, 6-2 and 10-3 tie-breaker to win the men’s doubles consolation match on Sunday.


THE TOP men’s teams in the Glen Arbor Tennis Tournament, from left, Doug Roberts and Karl Jones, and Mike Rubino and Brian Eckert, pose for a photo Sunday at the Glen Arbor tennis courts. Don Miller Photo THE TOP men’s teams in the Glen Arbor Tennis Tournament, from left, Doug Roberts and Karl Jones, and Mike Rubino and Brian Eckert, pose for a photo Sunday at the Glen Arbor tennis courts. Don Miller Photo Crouch, of Lansing and Glen Arbor, and Katona, of Rochester and Lake Leelanau, has won the doubles twice. Crouch also won the mixed title a few times.

“Rick and Russ played a very good match,” Katona said. “They had more success with their serves than we did.

“After we won the first set, they made adjustments to play more aggressively to change the momentum, and ultimately, the outcome in their favor. It was an effective plan.”

Katona credited tournament directors Kim Guilbeau and Jim Fowler for the tournament’s success.

“I enjoy playing in this tournament because of the community and positive atmosphere that is always on display,” said Katona, who also played doubles in the past with Guilbeau. “You will see spectators cheering on both teams and supporting good tennis. I give lots of credit to Kim and Jim for the success of this tournament year-after-year.”

Cindy Daniel and Rick Budinger defeated Wendy Daniel and Bob Sloan, 6-2, 6-2 in the mixed consolation match on Sunday.

In the senior round-robin action Friday, the winners were Bruce Allen, Chris Allen and Celeste Crouch.

In women’s doubles play on Saturday, Jen Gerling and Natalie Hazen defeated Paige and Julie Cooley, 6-2, 7-5.

Sandy Johnson and Carly Eckert beat Cindy Daniel and Nancy Schaefer 7-6, 6-4 in the consolation finals.

Llore, who figured he and his partner would have a tough time unseating Roberts and Jones, was glad to win the mixed title on Saturday with Paige Cooley,

“That Paige was pretty good and I was lucky to have her as my partner,” Llore said. “She was so good.”

“Don’t let Jordi fool you,” Guilbeau chimed in. “He’s a good player and she is good too.

“They made a good team.”

Llore, a Barcelona, Spain native, had played in the Glen Arbor tournament a few years back.

“It’s different than other tournaments,” Llore said. “In Traverse City, it’s a United States Tennis Sanctioned event and you know who you are going to play against and their ranking.

“Here it is more open. You don’t know who you are playing.”

Fowler and Guilbeau, who was unable to defend her women’s doubles title because of an injury, were pleased that the tournament drew 80 entries, including a full field of 16 teams.

Both Fowler and Guilbeau were busy about noon on Sunday getting the courts ready to play after an early morning downpour.

“I’ve squeegeed so many darn tennis courts,” said Fowler, a former high school tennis coach from Flint. “I’ve run over 40 high school regionals and it probably rained on 20 of them.”

“Jim and Kim do a fantastic job running it,” Rick Schanhals said. “We have great courts in Glen Arbor that are well maintained by the township.

“The setting could not be better. I really like the way the courts are split up so that you have the large viewing area in between.”

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