2017-03-02 / Front Page

Work at resort, but to board up lodge

No real progress in sight
By Eric Carlson
Of The Enterprise staff


A CONTRACTOR hired to board up and fence off Sugar Loaf Resort to bring it into compliance with the state Construction Code was delivering materials to the property earlier this week. A CONTRACTOR hired to board up and fence off Sugar Loaf Resort to bring it into compliance with the state Construction Code was delivering materials to the property earlier this week. Long-shuttered Sugar Loaf Resort is finally being, well ... shuttered.

Contractors were at the resort this week placing boards over broken windows and doors, posting “no trespassing” signs, and preparing to install a fence around much of the property.

County administrator Chet Janik said work to bring Sugar Loaf into compliance with the state Construction Code apparently began last week with the appearance of some new boards over windows and a few new “no trespassing” signs.

Neighbors have long complained that the blighted Sugar Loaf property is a magnet for vandals, presents serious safety hazards, and is driving down property values in the area.

While the work at the closed resort may not increase property values, it will bring the facility closer to meeting expectations of the county Construction Code Authority.

This week, two men with a rental truck and a pickup truck were busy working at the resort, boarding more of it up. The men declined to identify themselves but one confirmed they worked “directly for Jeff” (Katofsky), the new owner of the resort. The worker said Tuesday they would soon be installing a fence around the lodge.

In fact, the owner had three options to bring the Sugar Loaf Resort property into compliance with state Construction Code, according to Steve Haugen, head of the county’s Construction Code Authority.

The owner could completely tear down buildings on the site and clean up the area to be in compliance with the Construction Code. Or, the owner could spend the millions of dollars that would likely be required to rebuild the resort and bring the existing structures into compliance with the code.

The third option – boarding up the building and securing it in compliance with specific Construction Code requirements – is clearly the option being undertaken at this time, according to Haugen. It’s also the cheapest option.

Last year, the county charged the thenowner of the resort with a criminal misdemeanor for failing to comply with the Construction Code. But the former owner, a corporation known as 4500 Investments — controlled by a longtime owner of the resort, Remo Polselli — convinced county officials that a sale of the resort was imminent.

This time, it actually was.

Last year, a California real estate attorney, Jeff Katofsky, through his corporation Sweet Bread, L.L.C., acquired the resort from Polselli. Even though Katofsky’s corporation is the new owner of the resort, however, county officials say they have confirmed that Polselli still controls Katofsky’s mortgage on the property.

Earlier this year, county officials imposed a March 1 deadline on Katofsky to begin work to bring the resort up to code, and a May 1 deadline to finish the job or face criminal prosecution.

“Clearly, he’s moving ahead to comply even before our March 1 deadline,” Janik said. “We expect that Mr. Katofsky will also meet the May 1 deadline to have the place completely boarded up and secured in compliance with the Construction Code.”

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