2017-11-02 / Life in Leelanau

Market season closes as discussion turns to plans for 2018


TARAJI LEONARD of Suttons Bay was one of the few “hardy souls” who braved the rain and chill temperatures Saturday to shop at the final farmers’ market of the season Saturday in Suttons Bay. TARAJI LEONARD of Suttons Bay was one of the few “hardy souls” who braved the rain and chill temperatures Saturday to shop at the final farmers’ market of the season Saturday in Suttons Bay. Cold, rainy weather greeted a handful of vendors and a sparse turnout of customers at the final Leelanau County Farmers Market of the season Saturday in Suttons Bay.

“We might have had a few more vendors show up if the weather weren’t so nasty,” said market master Kristi Thomas.

Only four vendors were selling fruits, vegetables and other items at the market Saturday. Thomas said the number of vendors in Suttons Bay during the peak season this summer was 23. The farmers market in Suttons Bay is the county’s largest and longest-running.

Thomas was busy collecting the last of surveys that were to be analyzed this week as the Leelanau Agricultural Alliance and Michigan State University Extension consider plans for next year’s markets. The Leelanau Farmers Market Association has been a nonprofit organization since 2014.


MARKET MASTER Kristi Thomas collects surveys at the final farmers market of the season with mostly empty space behind her. Only four vendors appeared at the market Saturday in Suttons Bay. MARKET MASTER Kristi Thomas collects surveys at the final farmers market of the season with mostly empty space behind her. Only four vendors appeared at the market Saturday in Suttons Bay. Officials of the nonprofit are scheduled to meet at 5:45 p.m. today in the Community Meeting Room of the county Government Center in Suttons Bay Township.

“There are only a few hardy souls here today,” said Alan Bakker of Bakker’s Acres as he manned his farm stall at the last farmers market of the 2017 season Saturday in Suttons Bay.

Bundled up in a warm winter coat and protected from the rain under canopy, Bakker was looking on the bright side as he sold apples and other produce to dedicated customers.

“At least I’m not outside picking today,” Bakker said.

— Photos and story by Eric Carlson

Return to top