2018-08-30 / Front Page

Heavy rains drive through county

By Amy Hubbell
Of The Enterprise staff


A BLUE heron and a group of ducks enjoy the flooded banks of the Cedar River yesterday at Solon Township Park. Recent storms produced significant rainfall causing the river to swell. A BLUE heron and a group of ducks enjoy the flooded banks of the Cedar River yesterday at Solon Township Park. Recent storms produced significant rainfall causing the river to swell. Too much. Too fast.

That’s the sentiment of residents in Leelanau County who have seen more than six inches of rain in the past week, including 3.5 inches or more Tuesday evening into yesterday morning.

The deluge followed extremely dry conditions for most of August, as reported last in the Enterprise.

Mother Nature delivered a one-two punch to the county with the first round coming in the form of high winds early Tuesday morning with wind gusts of 65 mph reported at Leland Harbor.

Widespread power outages followed. Some Centerville Township residents are still in the dark.

“I enjoyed camping when my children were young, but I don’t enjoy it much now that I’m 84,” said Patricia Krajewski, who as of presstime Wednesday had been without power for 36 hours. “My ice cream is gone and I’m concerned about the other items in the refrigerator. And they’ve said some areas won’t be restored until Friday at 11:30 p.m..”


TODDLER ABNER Bisbee helps out with a tree that fell in his yard in Maple City during the first round of thunderstorms Monday night. His dad, Tom, is pictured helping Abner with the work by operating the chainsaw. TODDLER ABNER Bisbee helps out with a tree that fell in his yard in Maple City during the first round of thunderstorms Monday night. His dad, Tom, is pictured helping Abner with the work by operating the chainsaw. Krajewski’s home is one of 60 homes in the Cedar and 796 homes served by Consumer’s Energy who were without power as of presstime yesterday.

Power was out at 162 Consumer’s sites in Leelanau Township. However, customers were expected to be back on line by 3 p.m. yesterday.

“We have 88,650 customers without power statewide with a ‘worst case scenario’ of having them restored by 11:30 Friday,” said Roger Morgenstern, Consumers Energy spokesman. “Our hardest hit area was in an area north of Ludington along the lake.”


DEBRIS FROM trees like this on Co. Rd. 669 near M-22 kept road crews busy across the county Tuesday. DEBRIS FROM trees like this on Co. Rd. 669 near M-22 kept road crews busy across the county Tuesday. Between midnight and 8:30 Tuesday, the county dispatch center received more than 40 calls about downed trees and power lines, keeping first responders busy.

“We’ve had crews out from 2 a.m. Tuesday to 6 a.m. this morning with storm-related calls,” reported Chris Comeaux, Cedar Area Fire and Rescue chief, on Wednesday morning. “They literally had to stop and clear trees from the road on the way to the calls.”

Cherryland Electric Cooperative reported 2,900 occurrences with some members without power twice from 2:30 a.m. Tuesday to early Wednesday.

“Our shortest outage was 45 minutes and our longest was 14 hours,” said Cherryland spokesman Rachel Johnson.


HEAVY WINDS dumped a tree over a trailer near Leland. HEAVY WINDS dumped a tree over a trailer near Leland. Cherryland Electric Cooperative’s outage map included 17 residences with outages in the Northport area, with power expected to be restored yesterday by 2:15 p.m.

“They’ll be back on line by the time you go to print,” Johnson said.

At the Enterprise office in Lake Leelanau, presses lacked power to run and Internet service was down until about 2 p.m. Tuesday. Pressman Jeff Lingaur worked late Tuesday and joined Ray Mulliner in reporting early yesterday to get out five sections this week.

A second wave of storms hit Tuesday about dinner time.

“There was a ton of moisture available and the rain came down at a rate of 2 to 3 inches an hour,” National Weather Service meteorologist Mike Boguth said.

The weather service spotter in Lake Leelanau recorded 2.74 inches of rain through 10 p.m. Tuesday. One home at a private residence registered 3.6 inches; another gauge in Suttons Bay held 3.5 inches after the storm blew through.

Road Commission superintendent Dave Priest had four crews assigned to clean-up duties near Maple City and Suttons Bay.

Tuesday crews were clearing trees and limbs from roads. Yesterday morning they were tending to washouts.

“No matter where you drive you see them,” Priest said. “Out gravel roads took a good pounding.

“It will take us a couple days to get things back in order.”

The Road Commission got a call from Art’s Tavern in Glen Arbor about during the heaviest part of the storm, reporting water standing several inches deep on Lake Street.

The Michigan Department of Transportation has a drain there with a pump that pushes water to a storage pond.

“Our Maple City foreman checked it out. The pump was working but it couldn’t keep up,” Priest said.

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