Page 89 - Visitors Guide 18
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Casey Reynolds, a volunteer with Preserve Historic Sleeping Bear, demonstrates how to create legs for 3-legged stools at the 2017 Port Oneida Fair. The fair, scheduled for Aug. 10-11, annually attracts about 4,000 visitors.
Port Oneida tops Smokies for farm acres preserved
Lakeshore gets stamp
The new Sleeping Bear Dunes stamp, which represents the second Postage Service release with a Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore theme, will have its day in the limelight.
The stamp was scheduled to be the guest of honor at a party set for June 14 —  ag day. A tent with speakers and treats are planned.
The stamp was of cially released on Jan. 20, when several postage rate increases went into effect. It offers a view of the Empire beach looking toward Sleeping Bear Dunes with seagulls passing.
The Dunes’  rst stamp release created quite a stir. The Visitor Center was used as a post of ce on Oct. 2, 2008, to accommodate a “ rst day of issue” ceremony for a 42-cent stamp to celebrate Great Lakes Dune. The stamp featured a brightly
The newest Lakeshore stamp provides a view from near Empire looking north at the lake side of Sleeping Bear Dunes.
colored scene containing 27 different species and animals indigenous to the Lakeshore.
The stamp was part of the “Nature of America” series that started in 1999 with the Sonoran Desert.
Three beaches
(Continued from Page 88)
Pyramid Point, the Manitous and Whaleback. Like all of the west side of the county, they provide wonderful places to soak in a sunset.
Open  elds are not a natural state in most of Leelanau County.
They require clearing and then maintenance, which is what occurs each summer in the Port Oneida Historic District.
“The easiest way to keep trees and shrubs — woody plants — out is to cut whatever is there and mow them down,” said Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore deputy superintendent Tom Ulrich.
Without such maintenance, the agrarian setting that draws more than 4,000 people to the Port Oneida Fair each summer would soon be dominated
by tree sprouts and shrubs, including the invasive autumn olive.
Those visitors have access
to more than 3,400 acres of federal land in the historic district, of which 1,000 acres are kept in  elds. It’s the
largest such district within the National Park Service — even beating out famed Cades Cove in Great Smoky Mountain National Park.
“A few years ago we
did a cultural landscape management plan, and
we identi ed that for it to continue to resemble a historic landscape we needed to make some of the  elds stay open. Otherwise, why did these farmers build houses in the
middle of a forest,” Ulrich said. Credit goes to volunteers
with two groups, he continued: Preserve Historic Sleeping Bear and Friends of Sleeping Bear Dunes.
“We own the large tractor and funded the new mower that keeps the
invasives out once they are cleared,” said PHSB executive director Susan Pocklington. “PHSB proposed to the park this year that we get estimates from contractors ... to clear the  elds with a forestry mulcher, which would be far more ef cient and effective.”
Ulrich explained why modern-day tractors are used for the work.
“The ‘period of signi cance’ is from 1870 to 1945. The reason it’s so long is that was the
point when subsistent farmers were making their living in
the district. After 1945 a lot of farmers got second jobs to supplement their farming.”
Of course, tractors were well established on farms by 1945.
The National Park Service is open to new opportunities, including leasing land out as hay  elds or even a historic structure to a farmer for equipment storage.
“They would have to practice sustainable agriculture, without pesticides,” Ulrich said.
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